pigeon racing – FA Colombofilia http://facolombofilia.com/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 04:41:15 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://facolombofilia.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-3-120x120.png pigeon racing – FA Colombofilia http://facolombofilia.com/ 32 32 A pigeon race https://facolombofilia.com/a-pigeon-race/ Sun, 06 Mar 2022 04:41:15 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/a-pigeon-race/ QUETTA: The domestic pigeon, once used as a means of sending and receiving messages between armies and empires, is now primarily trained for marathons. In Balochistan, different clubs organize a specific marathon for the pigeons that compete for the title. It is considered expensive game and different types of domestic birds are imported and trained. […]]]>

QUETTA: The domestic pigeon, once used as a means of sending and receiving messages between armies and empires, is now primarily trained for marathons.

In Balochistan, different clubs organize a specific marathon for the pigeons that compete for the title. It is considered expensive game and different types of domestic birds are imported and trained.

A marathon started from Jhao area of ​​Awaran district with a finish line of 560 kilometers, which is their “homeland” in Quetta. The champion of this race, the Blue Pearl, reached in five hours and 15 minutes, if calculated otherwise with a speed of 100 km per hour.

Syed Zaheer Abbas Shah, regional secretary of Balochistan Pigeon Racing Club, said News Bowl that he has been interested in pigeon racing since 2010. “Quetta is currently number one in pigeon racing because the old pigeon enthusiasts are here. Now the interest has spread all over Pakistan. We have been running for two years now. There is one season per year with five to six games.

In winter, these matches start in December or January and end in February, he added. “Our running club has 60 members, 40 of whom competed this time. There are different clubs in which each club has five to six matches. Lots of people are interested in racing but can’t afford to buy horses, so it’s a great hobby for them.

The regional secretary further said domestic bird breeds are either imported or “well domesticated” to avoid the spread of any disease. “We are finding a cure for this. We made Balochistan history and released 2,100 pigeons simultaneously. Speed ​​also recorded which was one minute sprint at 1,817 meters. The diet of racing pigeons varies. They [are] also provided multivitamins.

It’s an expensive hobby, but it’s growing, he commented. “A fan participated in the world championships this year and others will participate in international competitions next year. Pigeons with good races sell for a very high price. Because many people are poor, they [end up] sell them. »

Mohammad Amir Marri, a pigeon racing enthusiast, said: “I have been passionate about pigeon racing for three years now. It is a great achievement that this game was launched in Balochistan. Because nowadays gatherings have become very rare. This hobby is carried out even sitting at home. Pigeon racing is a source of peace of mind.

“We welcome the youth of Baluchistan to this sport. Previously, there was little information on where and how to import birds. This game is not perceived positively, but if you go abroad, this game is very popular,” he added.

In the past, pigeons were the means of communication, he explained. “During World War II, pigeons saved the lives of over 150 soldiers through messaging. I’m very supportive of this hobby. Whoever started it can’t leave it. And it’s a very cool game. In 2017, my partner and I imported birds. Then we found some friends who guided us.

Marri also said he imported certain breeds of pigeons from England. “We import [them] through authorized business partners. There have been some issues over the past two years due to the coronavirus situation. One bird has been sold for over 210 million rupees in the UK.

Many people have pigeons, but their training is important, he stressed. “There are [many] pigeon species. Some are long flying birds, some are fast birds. We also plan to launch long-distance sports in the future.

Marri revealed that he has kept 90 pigeons in his house, each of which is said to cost him Rs 15,000 per month. “And that only includes food. The type of grain to feed the pigeon is up to you. Previously, the supplements were not available in Pakistan at all. We order supplements from overseas which take up to two months to arrive.

Rafy Marri said News Bowl that the Balochistan Pigeon Racing Club organizes competitions every year. “We have organized many competitions over the past two years. We also have the fastest speed record in all of Pakistan.

“We are now moving the race to an electronic timing system which is international standard,” he said. “The bird is scanned and can be seen anywhere in the world, via ETS. Under this system, we will be running international competitions which will also be approved globally. These competitions are very popular internationally in Belgium and other European countries The importance of these competitions will increase with the advent of the ETS.

Pigeon racing as a sport began in Belgium, where in 1818 the first long-distance race over 100 miles (160 km) is said to have taken place in 1820.

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Pigeon racing in Lanarkshire and why this much-loved sport has been flying high for centuries https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-racing-in-lanarkshire-and-why-this-much-loved-sport-has-been-flying-high-for-centuries/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 19:50:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-racing-in-lanarkshire-and-why-this-much-loved-sport-has-been-flying-high-for-centuries/ It may not be the most popular sport, but there are some devout Lanarkshires with an undying passion for pigeon racing. The activity can see the birds cover more than 500 miles in a matter of hours as they are closely timed in fierce competition around the world. The pigeons are taken to chosen locations […]]]>

It may not be the most popular sport, but there are some devout Lanarkshires with an undying passion for pigeon racing.

The activity can see the birds cover more than 500 miles in a matter of hours as they are closely timed in fierce competition around the world.

The pigeons are taken to chosen locations and released, instructed to return to their respective homes as quickly as possible.



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Better known as “homing”, the time it takes the animal to cover the distance is measured against its speed of movement, calculating which bird returns home at the fastest speed.

And as local band Coalburn and District Homing Club showed with a host of sparkling trophies at their recent awards night, the prizes can be quite impressive for this unique sport.

But on January 29, the annual gathering was more like a reunion and celebration of club members getting to meet again, having not seen each other since before the pandemic.



Coalburn and District Homing Club

The trophy presentation and dancing took place at Harris and Ollie’s home in Lesmahagow with guests and other Tranent fanciers accompanied by over 50 other people on the night.

New member of the Lanarkshire club and writer for numerous pigeon racing publications, Mary Thomson spoke with Lanarkshire Live about her love for homing and how she wants to see it promoted more in local areas.

She hopes that more young people will become interested in the sport by telling about the fantastic things that pigeons can do.

Mary told us: “Pigeon racing dates back hundreds of years, as well as in times of war, when pigeons were bred and taken in boxes to carry messages across different countries.

“Pigeons are actually quite intelligent animals. But it’s a dying sport.

“New housing estates, town halls and birds of prey are all challenges for homeing today.

“We used to try to promote it in schools, but you can’t do that anymore.

“In places like the Netherlands and Belgium they take pigeon racing to a whole new level.”



Frankie the pigeon was gifted to Mary at the club and he has already traveled over 200 miles

Racing pigeons are specially bred and trained with some worth a fortune, with Mary telling us of a pigeon that recently sold for £30,000 in Blackpool.

“The things these pigeons can do, they can fly over 500 miles in a day,” she added. “They can be released at 5 a.m. and go home at 5 p.m. if it’s a good race.

“It’s just to try to get the message out to people, and it might even affect a little boy who maybe doesn’t like football for example.”

The Coalburn Awards Night was the first time since pre-COVID that members and riders could meet.

“Beautiful trophies were awarded that night,” added Mary.

“I was blown away by the quality of the club and the involvement of everyone. It was packed.”

“I don’t think I’ve been to such a well-supported event for so long. It was especially nice to see the young families there, with their young children.

“I’ve only been to the Coalburn party twice and both times they’ve always been very well attended. Secretary Hazel Harrison goes above and beyond to make sure every detail is thought out and everything goes smoothly. Good.”

The amount of equipment used in pigeon racing is large and has evolved over the years.

The pigeons have electronic timing systems to accurately record their travel times, which is essential given the proximity of the races – sometimes in just seconds.

They are also transported in specialist trailers to ensure a level playing field for the racing pigeons and so that they can all check in as they leave at the same time.

Each of the pigeons is given a metal tracker around their leg, and when they return from racing they beep so they are timed.

The racing season runs from April to September.

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Don’t blame Brexit for the sad decline of the British pigeon industry https://facolombofilia.com/dont-blame-brexit-for-the-sad-decline-of-the-british-pigeon-industry/ Wed, 09 Feb 2022 16:55:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/dont-blame-brexit-for-the-sad-decline-of-the-british-pigeon-industry/ It’s hard to believe now, but it was once hard to find a pub in Britain without a loyal community of fanciers. Known as the ‘worker’s horses’, enthusiasts would gather at the bar to exchange gossip, advice and sometimes even the birds themselves. Most streets in the UK actually had dovecotes in back gardens or […]]]>

It’s hard to believe now, but it was once hard to find a pub in Britain without a loyal community of fanciers.

Known as the ‘worker’s horses’, enthusiasts would gather at the bar to exchange gossip, advice and sometimes even the birds themselves. Most streets in the UK actually had dovecotes in back gardens or on housing estates. Everyone knew someone who bred pigeons.

Far from being just a popular pastime, pigeon racing has a royal pedigree. In 1886, HRH Edward, Prince of Wales – later King Edward VII, the Queen’s great-grandfather – built royal dovecotes on the Sandringham estate. Thus began a significant cultural shift from what was previously perceived as for the “poor man” to a social pastime for all. The queen still keeps pigeons to this day.

Yet, tragically, all is not well in the henhouse. From being one of the most popular sports in Britain during the Victorian and Edwardian era – particularly by miners and railway workers, who took days off to compete – its popularity has steadily declined ever since. .

The first blow came with the strikes and cuts in the railways of the 1960s, when the number of railway workers and lines fell sharply. The rail network was a quick and easy way to release the pigeons. Then came pit closings in the 1970s, triggering a similar decline in the number of men who could afford the time and money to participate.

Now, however, he has been hit particularly hard, not by Brexit bureaucracy, but by the high number of pub closures and – believe it or not – the resurgence of peregrine falcons.

Pigeon racing is a social event and the closure of many local pubs and clubs has had a devastating impact. Young people are no longer playing sports as they once did: there are simply too many distractions from electronic devices, and as the amateur age group ages, unfortunately there are simply no the number of younger members to replace them.

However, the biggest problem facing the 20,000 members of the Royal Pigeon Racing Association is the increase in raptors which are decimating our birds.

Today, fans are in a constant daily battle. Peregrine falcons in particular are encouraged to nest and breed in unnatural environments, causing havoc in the local ecology and in fanciers who lose their precious birds each time they are released for training or the race. It can be totally devastating and is an unrecognized consequence of peregrine breeding programs, which were introduced to appeal to tourists in scenic locations.

Unless the raptor problem is solved, a sport enjoyed by millions in the UK and around the world, a sport of kings and queens, will be lost forever.

It is interesting to compare this with the incredible growth of the sport in China. Beijing alone has 100,000 fanciers. Considered the sport of the wealthy young man, it is attracting significant investment and experiencing exponential growth. Such is the demand for elite pigeons in the Far East, a pigeon named Armando recently sold for a staggering US$1.4 million.

The opportunities for businessmen, especially in China, to invest in the global market for the purchase of pigeons mainly from Europe see a profitable financial return on their capital for their feathered assets and the prices at which their offspring are assessed.

The media attention to these purchases is helpful and if properly harnessed could reignite a passion for pigeon racing here in the UK. But that will require greater sensitivity to the impact of some trends that have been ongoing in Britain for decades.

With the help of the APPG Racing Pigeon chaired by MP Craig Williams, significant progress has been made in raising awareness in Westminster to promote a better understanding and appreciation of the social, sporting and cultural benefits of pigeon racing.

The introduction of several schools using pigeons into their daily school curriculum, such as the Kingsmead School Pigeon Project and Peel Park School in Lancashire, has been hailed for contributing to an alternative educational approach, meeting the needs of all pupils who can use their birds. as a teaching tool.

Fancy pigeon racing in the UK is still a popular pastime for many. The social element involved in pigeon breeding continues to be an essential part of daily life for many families and friends. Believe me, there is no greater feeling than seeing a pigeon return home to its loft after flying hundreds of miles. This gives an unparalleled feeling of excitement.

So, with the support of government and local communities, our beloved sport can once again survive and thrive. Who knows, maybe one day she will experience a renaissance similar to the one she experienced abroad.

What a coo that would be.


Lee Fribbins is editor of carrier pigeon, the only weekly independent pigeon

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Pigeon racing is disappearing among the working class, says veteran breeder https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-racing-is-disappearing-among-the-working-class-says-veteran-breeder/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 20:01:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-racing-is-disappearing-among-the-working-class-says-veteran-breeder/ Mr Evans, meanwhile, speculated that it may have something to do with the decline of workers’ clubs. “Before, people saw the pigeon sport, or knew about the pigeon sport, just by going to the local women’s clubs. But now, you know, if you don’t go to those areas, you don’t know the sport exists. He […]]]>

Mr Evans, meanwhile, speculated that it may have something to do with the decline of workers’ clubs. “Before, people saw the pigeon sport, or knew about the pigeon sport, just by going to the local women’s clubs. But now, you know, if you don’t go to those areas, you don’t know the sport exists.

He was optimistic about the future of the sport, saying the decline in membership was leveling off. “There are new people coming into the sport: men, women, children, all, you know, all different backgrounds.”

In recent years, the association has begun to reach out to schools.

“We now have six schools across the country with lofts,” Mr Evans said. “The children take care of the pigeons and enter them in competitions in local clubs, and have been quite successful. The pigeon project, as it is called in each school, is then integrated into the program, because pigeon racing can lend itself lots of different things in history, math – which is used to calculate the outcome of a race – and geography.”

The media attention on China’s mega-buys is helpful, Mr Evans said, because “it has brought public attention to the sport, which we struggle with.” Overall the Chinese interest in the sport had “little impact” in Britain, “unless you were one of the lucky ones who were able to sell some of their pigeons for significant sums”.

The decline, then, may not be terminal. “We can fix this and ensure that traditional racing will survive in the future,” said Mr Evans.

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seven caught, 521 birds rescued in Andhra – The New Indian Express https://facolombofilia.com/seven-caught-521-birds-rescued-in-andhra-the-new-indian-express/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/seven-caught-521-birds-rescued-in-andhra-the-new-indian-express/ By Express press service NELLORE: Naidupeta Police disrupted a pigeon racing event organized by a group of seven people. They rescued 521 pigeons kept in 27 plastic boxes and arrested the seven men at Biravada junction in Naidupeta mandal on Monday. The defendants were identified as A Philips (48), P Venkatesan (46), Raj Mohan (28), […]]]>

By Express press service

NELLORE: Naidupeta Police disrupted a pigeon racing event organized by a group of seven people. They rescued 521 pigeons kept in 27 plastic boxes and arrested the seven men at Biravada junction in Naidupeta mandal on Monday. The defendants were identified as A Philips (48), P Venkatesan (46), Raj Mohan (28), A Francis (29), Srinviasan Ramesh (39), M Marthand (52), Chandrababu Balaji (28). The gang originated from Tamil Nadu.

According to circle inspector YV Somaiah, A Philips of Tiruchirapalli in Tamil Nadu had organized pigeon races and made huge profits through betting. “The pigeons are trained to return to their breeding grounds to take part in the races. Tags are attached to their legs to easily identify their owners. The birds are transported to Tada, Naidupeta and Gudur by trucks. They are then freed from these regions as part of the race. Pigeons that reach Tiruchirapally are announced as winners and the owner of the birds receives a cash prize. Usually the races are held in winter, in the months of January and February,” CI said.

Philips, the main defendant, had handed over the pigeons to P Venkatesan, the truck driver. Venkatesan and five others then reached the Biravada Junction Road (National Road 71) in Naidupeta on February 6. The accused allegedly used false documents to transport the pigeons.

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Pigeon owner in Tamil Nadu’s Kovai aims for race record – The New Indian Express https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-owner-in-tamil-nadus-kovai-aims-for-race-record-the-new-indian-express/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 19:58:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-owner-in-tamil-nadus-kovai-aims-for-race-record-the-new-indian-express/ Express news service COIMBATORE: Do you remember Maari, the Tamil movie that highlights pigeon racing? Well if you don’t then this domestic pigeon will surprise you. A pigeon of the variety Thavadaal (Colombia livia domesticata), less than a year old, set a record flying 85 hours and 11 minutes in a recent seven-day race in […]]]>


Express news service

COIMBATORE: Do you remember Maari, the Tamil movie that highlights pigeon racing? Well if you don’t then this domestic pigeon will surprise you. A pigeon of the variety Thavadaal (Colombia livia domesticata), less than a year old, set a record flying 85 hours and 11 minutes in a recent seven-day race in Kempatty Settlement.

Of the 13 birds that took part, the one belonging to S Udayan obtained the first place by flying longer than the prescribed time limit. According to the competition rules, a bird would be eligible to fly the next day if it had flown more than 10 hours on the first day.

Udayan (36), a silversmith, told TNIE: “On the first day my pigeon was released at 7 am and took off until 7:53 pm It did not take any water or sat down. It flew for 13 hours and 53 minutes on the first day and 13 hours on the seventh day. An arbitrator has been appointed to watch the bird.

Sharing his training techniques, Udayan said, “My younger brother MS Saravanan and I breed over 100 birds in my house. We have been participating in bird races for the past two decades. We learned the art of pigeon breeding and racing from my father Sivaraj and my grandfather Masane Gowder. Every day we spend 100 euros to buy foods such as ragi, corn and green gram. “

He added: “We also provide them with nutritious foods such as almonds, dates and cashews to improve their endurance while running.”

The Coimbatore District Pigeon Welfare Association has recognized the bird’s talent and Udayan is considering applying to the Guinness Book of Records for listing. “I also speak with members of the Pigeon Welfare Association in Chennai and they assured me to help me achieve the bird victory in the Guinness Book of Records.”

Recounting his birds’ previous victory, he said: “In 2002 one of our females flew 79 hours and 25 minutes and set a record.

When contacted, former secretary J Ramakrishnan and current secretary of the Coimbatore District Pigeon Welfare Association A Abbas said: “So far the pigeons have flown. up to 82 and 83 hours. Only the pigeon belonging to Udayan flew for 85 hours and 11 minutes.

The O Dharamalingam bird flew for 83 hours 49 minutes and took second place while AKS Groups took third place with the flying bird for 76 hours and 30 minutes.


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Kowie Pigeon Racing Club “baby” pigeon auction https://facolombofilia.com/kowie-pigeon-racing-club-baby-pigeon-auction/ Thu, 28 Oct 2021 07:07:15 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/kowie-pigeon-racing-club-baby-pigeon-auction/ The Kowie Pigeon Racing Club (KPRC) is hosting an auction of “baby” pigeons and steak braai on Saturday, October 30 at the Port Alfred Country Club, and all are invited to enjoy the day and bid at the auction. The auction is intended to help raise funds and enlighten future pigeon fanciers in the art […]]]>


The Kowie Pigeon Racing Club (KPRC) is hosting an auction of “baby” pigeons and steak braai on Saturday, October 30 at the Port Alfred Country Club, and all are invited to enjoy the day and bid at the auction.

The auction is intended to help raise funds and enlighten future pigeon fanciers in the art of pigeon racing.

Squeakers (baby pigeons) are donated by pigeon fanciers to the club and auctioned off to other fanciers or to any member of the public. The squeakers are then assigned to members of the KPRC and housed in their lofts. They are trained with the KPRC member’s own birds in preparation for the upcoming 2022 racing season. They will then compete in a special “sell” race in July 2022. The cash prizes for the top three positions are paid out in a ratio of 50 : 30: 20%. Buyers of these squeakers will be informed of their welfare as well as the results of the pre-sale training and races.

If any member of the public would like to participate in this exciting auction, or simply learn more about pigeon racing while enjoying a relaxing braai steak, please contact Linton Randall for catering purposes no later than Friday 29th. October at 4 p.m.

The agenda for the day will be a word of welcome and remarks by the President of the Provincial Pigeon Organization of the Eastern Province at 11 a.m., followed by a steak braai, socialization and the observation of squeakers from 12 noon. The squeaker auction starts at 2 p.m.

Information and catering, contact Linton Randall at 079-609-3517.

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The Melbourne Cup of Pigeon Racing is stolen and lost | The temperature https://facolombofilia.com/the-melbourne-cup-of-pigeon-racing-is-stolen-and-lost-the-temperature/ Mon, 09 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/the-melbourne-cup-of-pigeon-racing-is-stolen-and-lost-the-temperature/ On Saturday August 7, the Southern Fleurieu Racing Pigeon Club (SFRPC) flew the second Olary race of the season, a distance of 390 kilometers. This race was the club’s fundraiser or commonly known as the “Melbourne Cup of Pigeon Racing”. Many birds have been praised by the public, but unfortunately there can only be one […]]]>


On Saturday August 7, the Southern Fleurieu Racing Pigeon Club (SFRPC) flew the second Olary race of the season, a distance of 390 kilometers.

This race was the club’s fundraiser or commonly known as the “Melbourne Cup of Pigeon Racing”.

Many birds have been praised by the public, but unfortunately there can only be one winner.

The race was won by Tex and Lola Jelfs’ partnership with their bird named ‘Cookie’.

“Cookie” had a fantastic run and was so happy to be home that she did a few winning circles from the loft before landing. A very arrogant pigeon.

The highly anticipated bird named ‘Hurtle’ who has been a regular participant in this race over the years was a bit lazy and returned later in the afternoon. “Hurtle” will come back big and better in 2022.

Four flyers sent 71 birds which were released at 8 a.m. along with 1165 carrier pigeons from Adelaide. The weather in Olary was fine with high light clouds and no wind.

En route, the birds encountered increasing southwest to west southwest winds of 14 km / h. The weather in Victor Harbor was covered in high cloud with a southwesterly wind of 17 km / h.

The first home pigeon was timed by Rhubarb Racing Loft at 2:20 p.m. with a flight time of 6:19:51 a.m. and a winning speed of 1043 meters per minute or 62 km / h.

Just behind, B. Lintern then E. Joy.

“The pigeon club would like to thank everyone who supported our club in this race,” said a spokesperson.

Next week’s race is from Glendamdo and is for young birds only.


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Flying Hopes: the passion of Kashmiri pigeons https://facolombofilia.com/flying-hopes-the-passion-of-kashmiri-pigeons/ Sun, 08 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/flying-hopes-the-passion-of-kashmiri-pigeons/ Mohammad Abbas Sofi, 45, a well-known pigeon fancier from the Moti Mohalla area of ​​Dalgate in Srinagar, says he has been breeding pigeons for three decades. He says and it is his passion and helps relieve stress and worry. “We are stealing hope, it gives me a unique feeling. Our family has a long history […]]]>


Mohammad Abbas Sofi, 45, a well-known pigeon fancier from the Moti Mohalla area of ​​Dalgate in Srinagar, says he has been breeding pigeons for three decades. He says and it is his passion and helps relieve stress and worry.

“We are stealing hope, it gives me a unique feeling. Our family has a long history of breeding pigeons and when I grew up I also started to breed them,” he said.

Currently Sofi has 60-80 pigeons of different breeds. Throughout the year, he sells and buys new ones according to his passion for pigeon racing.

Sofi is a businessman by profession and spends most of his free time with the pigeons. He feeds them three times a day and says to himself that it’s kind of an addiction. “During the mating season there is a need for more care compared to normal days,” he said.

For several years now, bird lovers in the valley have started breeding pigeons again. “There are different breeds of pigeons including Musier, Khatri, Check, Lal Anch and Matakali which are the cutest because of their long tails, but they can’t fly that high,” said Sofi.

The 45-year-old says Lal Anch (red-eyed pigeon) is the most popular these days and is loved by young enthusiasts. Now foreign pigeons are also sold in Kashmir, including sun season pigeons, Turkey and Pakistani pigeons, he said.

He said that there is another type of bird called a dump pigeon. It is a category of breeds of domestic pigeons and is mainly developed for participating in competitions. They are well trained, intelligent and known for their strength, he said.

“The local Kashmiri pigeons are mainly bred in villages as they require less attention and can survive on their own without much care. This includes the red tajdar pigeons,” he said.

Regarding the prices of the pigeons, Sofi specifies that it depends on the choice of the owner. “Normally a pair of pigeons costs around 2,000 to 3,000 rupees, while sometimes it can go beyond that, there are people who buy a pair for 10,000 to 15,000 rupees in Srinagar,” he said. he adds.

There is more enthusiasm among the younger generation for pigeon racing. In Srinagar, there are famous points where pigeons are sold, bought and traded, including Malkhah, Chattabal, Sadakada, Ranger stop and other parts of the city.

At Lal Chowk Mall, one can often see people feeding pigeons near the iconic Clock Tower. In the famous shrines of Kashmir, pigeons can be seen everywhere and devotees love to feed them.

Abdul Hameed Bakshi, a pigeon fancier from Yadipora Hyderbeigh in Baramulla in North Kashmir, has been in the pigeon racing business for 12 years. He said he dropped out of school halfway because of his passion for breeding pigeons.

“Over the years there has been a massive decline in pigeon breeding in villages, but now it has started to gain momentum. I buy and sell pigeons all over Kashmir. D’Uri in Qazigund there is a particular demand from people living in towns and villages around pigeons, ”he said.

Bakshi says that in the villages of Kashmir there are popular breeds of pigeons, including Tajal Mozal, Masakali and foreign breeds. “They can be bought for 20,000 to 30,000 rupees a pair and sometimes more,” he said.

“Breeding pigeons is nothing but love for them because it requires passion. My morning starts with calling these pigeons and ends with feeding them properly. It gives me a unique feeling when a pigeon becomes happy, “he said.

Bakshi says the high-flying pigeons are part of traditional Kashmiri society and their history dates back to the Mughal era when Akber introduced them to the valley.

“The key to good health is prevention. The same goes for breeding pigeons. Sick carrier pigeons cannot produce healthy offspring and sick pigeons in one loft expose other lofts to a risk of contamination, “he said.

“We also have to take care of their health. Usually we vaccinate them several times a year and take extra hygiene measures,” he added.

About pigeons trained to transmit or send messages, he said, with the advent of new, faster and more reliable technologies, there is little or no possibility at the moment.

Another pigeon fancier, Mudasir Yousuf, from the Kokernag region in Anantnag equates pigeons as a symbol of love and peace. They are birds of sacrifice, dream, kindness and understanding, he said.

“After I graduated I opened a clothing store. I take the time to take care of and feed my pigeons. They are like my own family,” he said.

“My family asks me to get rid of them, but I love them too much. This is my passion; I plan to make them a permanent space on our roof, ”he said.

Yousuf said that unlike other parts of the world where races and other competitions are held, here people have limited retention of pigeons out of passion only.

“There are a lot of pigeons that people love to breed, including roller pigeons which are known for their bold and aggressive looks. While the fantail pigeon has the appearance of the fan-shaped tail and the textures of silky feathers, ”he said.

Yousuf said carrier pigeons are known for their ability to return to their nests. They are also known for their flying qualities despite long distances and are used in competition. At first they were also called messenger pigeons, he said.

Faizan Ahmad Shah, a dovecote from Magarmal Bagh, initially said his family opposed his passion. “But I motivated them. I made a henhouse for the pigeon which is still divided into several parts: a cage and a breeding room,” he said.

“They make me happy. There are a lot of people in our society who indulge in drug addiction and smoking. Raising pigeons is a thousand times better than that and helps relieve stress and keep one out. between them engaged, ”he said.

Shah said that from childhood he was prone to pigeons. There are different types of pigeons which are classified according to their texture, type of beak, nails and eye color.

“I like to keep Moesur (dotted), Chot (all in white), Zug (black), Zawdogh (white and black) and Kal-Wozul in the local language,” he said.

Shah said that over the past decades in Srinagar, hundreds of people are keenly interested in breeding pigeons. It is increasing with each passing day and during the Covid-19 lockdown there has been an increase in local demand, ”Shah added.

Estimate

There are different breeds of pigeons including Musier, Khatri, Check, Lal Anch and Matakali pigeons which are the most adorable because of their long tails.

Breeding pigeons is only love for them because it takes passion. My morning starts with calling these pigeons and ends with feeding them properly. It gives me a unique feeling when a pigeon becomes happy.

My family asks me to get rid of them, but I love them too much. This is my passion; I plan to make them a permanent space on our roof.


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Pigeon races still fly high in Sheffield despite fears for its future https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-races-still-fly-high-in-sheffield-despite-fears-for-its-future/ Mon, 05 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://facolombofilia.com/pigeon-races-still-fly-high-in-sheffield-despite-fears-for-its-future/ It was in the 1960s that pigeon racing first aroused his interest. Within a few years, he had his own loft. He broke something using an old cabinet he found on a tip. Carving out an entrance for the birds, it was just large enough for about half a dozen birds at the house near […]]]>


It was in the 1960s that pigeon racing first aroused his interest. Within a few years, he had his own loft.

He broke something using an old cabinet he found on a tip. Carving out an entrance for the birds, it was just large enough for about half a dozen birds at the house near Burgoyne Road, Walkley, where he grew up.

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Pat Helliwell a Grenoside fancier. Photo Scott Merrylees

Today, with decades of professional skill in his trade and extensive experience in breeding winning pigeons, he has a huge loft at his home near Grenoside, with space for his 100 pigeons.

Pat, 64, still enjoys his hobby – but fears he faces issues that could see him make history.

The last high-profile issue to hit the headlines recently was the fear that races that traditionally started in France could end because of Brexit. But he sees other issues raising its head in a hobby that has been a Sheffield staple for generations.

“I’ve been racing pigeons since I was little,” said Pat, now one of the most successful racers at the Wadsley Bridge Flying Club, which is part of the Stocksbridge and District Federation in the field of pigeon racing. .

Pat Helliwell a Grenoside fancier. Photo Scott Merrylees

“My first race was in 1970, but I had kept birds for a few years before that. I started keeping them when I was 10 years old.

“At that time, the kids were out all day and we had animals. We fished or raised ferrets or pigeons. Most kids my age had pigeons – it was pretty big.

“In my early teens I learned to understand better what it was about.”

His first race saw his birds fly from Kettering to Sheffield in 1970. His best finisher was ninth. At that time, he had to mark the time on a clock on a marker tied around the bird’s leg to indicate when he was home, much like “clocking in” at work.

Pat Helliwell a Grenoside fancier. Photo Scott Merrylees

But times have changed and birds now carry a barcode. When entering his dovecote, the code is retrieved by an electronic reader, like at the checkout of a supermarket, automatically notifying the race organizers.

It’s not the only science involved. Birds’ diets are developed using the same type of techniques that athletes use to prepare them for races.

But there isn’t a lot of money in the races, he said.

“What I love most is when my pigeons win races,” he said. “That and see my pigeons come home. Bringing them home is the first and foremost thing. My wife says they’re like my babies.

John Healey MP with Mick McGrevy, who keeps and races pigeons

He raises them as well as the races. Owners seek to find successful breeding pairs, in much the same way as owners of racehorses.

Among his most successful pigeons is a bird he calls Sea Biscuit. Sea Biscuit won a Merit Award from the Royal Pigeon Racing Association last year.

This was in recognition of Sea Biscuit’s exceptional success in what the racing community calls Channel Races – races that start in France and return to England via the Channel.

There were three in his area last year. His bird won two.

“It’s a big deal, everyone wants to win them,” he said. “If you get a first place, you do well. “

But next year there are fears that the races will not take place because of Brexit.

New animal health regulations due to go into effect on April 21 reportedly required pigeons to have a health certificate signed by a veterinarian and to be in the EU for 21 days prior to release. In May, the EU agreed to extend the transition period for regulations until October 2021, but member states can apply their own national rules and France continues to require an animal health certificate.

UK owners want the requirements to be removed completely.

“Owners appreciate the need for strict regulations for travel to the EU, but these birds pose a low risk and are not imported, but only transported and then released,” said Mr Healey.

Pat says there are homeowners in town who are very upset with this change. But that’s not the only issue runners are facing right now.

They are also concerned about the increase in the number of birds of prey in the wild affecting their animals.

“We have a big problem with the birds of prey killing our pigeons,” he said. “The number of hawks and peregrine falcons is a big problem. People are raising them. Many of these birds are making a comeback. For pigeons it’s a big problem, so much so that a lot of people have integrated it. I understand they are eliminating songbirds as well. During the war, birds of prey were slaughtered to protect carrier pigeons bringing messages from Europe.

He is also concerned about the number of youngsters taking pigeons.

Pat has a son and a daughter as well as pigeons. They ask him how his birds are doing, but neither has started the hobby themselves.

“My club has 25 members,” he said. The federation may have 100, there are more on the other side of Sheffield too.

“Our federation sends around 1,500 birds per week. When I was 20, it was around 3,000.

“I’m afraid it will go out.”


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